Hating kids is cynicism in the extreme

When I was a liberal, I used to complain about children. How loud they were, how annoying, how they destroy the planet. There is, of course, some truth to this. But at its root, it is cynicism in the extreme.

Then I became a father and grew to reject these narrow, short-sighted, misanthropic views. Becoming a parent is part of the natural process of renewal that all humans need to witness and share. Seeing the world through the eyes of your own child erodes some of that cynicism and replaces it with joy. Parenthood is such an amazing experience. Almost everyone should do it.

Casual Sex and the Decline of the West

Indulge me for a moment. You don’t have to agree with every word, but hear me out.

The availability of casual sex without marriage, fatherhood, commitment, etc. has weakened men. It has made men slippery, less capable of commitment, more prone to dishonesty- generally, less attractive to women.

Giving up casual sex has made women more emotionally confused, less authentic, less happy. Case in point, the Aziz Ansari story.

The result? Fewer marriages, families, relationships. An embrace of atheism and hedonism over all else. And the decline of families.

Pablo Escobar and the Male Archetype

Pablo Escobar from Narcos.

I’m currently watching Narcos on Netflix and finding myself in the strange position of being both repulsed by and kind of liking the character of Pablo Escobar. He is, of course, a horrible man. But he also is a good family man. He’s much like the Tony Soprano character- a likable, but pretty evil guy. He takes care of his family and he takes care of his crew members (for the most part). He is a provider and a protector, admirable traits to men.

This is why our culture needs stable, admirable archetypes. Without them, we start to gravitate away from the proper role model, JC.

#7Tips to Be a Better Father

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It’s that time of year when we are supposed to recognize our fathers despite raising us under the inherent tyranny that is family life. Here are a few ideas to help you be the best dad you can be, whether your kid deserves it or not. Kidding! They all deserve the best you can offer.

  1. Put the phone down and pay attention! This is perhaps the most important bit of advice I can offer. For at least a little while every day, spend time with your kids without any other distractions. None. Focus! You’re kid will appreciate it greatly and you’ll remember it for years to come.
  2. Carve out one-on-one time with each kid regularly. This is obviously easier in some families than others, but try to spend that one-on-one time on at least a weekly basis. Maybe every Saturday morning or every Sunday afternoon. With some flexibility, of course.
  3. Remember you are being watched. I was watching my 4.75-year-old eat cereal the other day and after he had finished scooping out and eating the O’s, he picked up the bowl and drink it down like a hungry orphan. This is something I learned my from father and he learned from his, no doubt. Anyway, everything you do is being watched carefully. And eventually, much of that behavior will be acted out. So behave yourself.
  4. Educate yourself a little. There are more and more resources available to parents. In the DC area, we have a fantastic organization called the Parent Encouragement Program that offers dozens of classes online and in-person on positive parenting. I’ve taken a few. Very helpful.
  5. Take good care of yourself. If you are responsible for others, whether financially or otherwise, it’s critical that you make sure they are cared for and supported. Eat healthy. Exercise. Go to the doctor. It’s not that hard and it’s very important.
  6. Play rough with your boys. There is some evidence that ADHD is linked to a lack of rough play in childhood. There are some who argue that it may just be a sleep deficit. I’m on the fence. I have it. I’m just not sure what causes it.
  7. Try to get along with the mother of your child. This may be the hardest one, especially in cases of divorce, but it’s important. Really try!

Will try to update this with links ASAP.- dv

Choosing to Be an Atheist Is Like Choosing to Be an Orphan

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Being an orphan is a tragic thing. I know, I was raised by one. It’s even worse when you try to go through life without moral and ethical guidance. I tried. For 40 years, I thought I was a good person and that being so was enough to get by in life. It’s not. Because you need the other people in your life to adhere to a moral code, too.

There is a wisdom to religion that Sam Harris and the New Atheists don’t grasp. It is the wisdom of how to live day in and day out, week in and week out. Live with gratitude and work towards a cause much greater than yourself. There is nothing wrong with accepting some help from a father or the Father.

What Do You Do When Your Father Lets You Down?

You love him anyway. Or at least honor him from an arm’s length anyway. Maybe you eventually start to teach him what it means to be a man, a husband, a father, a patriarch.

You forgive him, you do your best to let those betrayals and disappointments float away, and show him how it’s done right.

Some of the Most Beautiful Words I’ve Heard

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Come from Jordan Peterson: “Wherever we go, and I mean that, wherever we go… If I go down the street or if I’m in an airport or if I’m in a cafe or if I’m in a movie theater… If I’m in a mechanics’ shop, some person comes up to me every 10 minutes, and they say, ‘I’ve been listening to your lectures and they’ve helped me. And my life is getting better.’… Can you imagine a better way to be greeted when you go out in the world?” -from a recent talk with Dennis Prager.

Watching @jordanbpeterson ‘s talks helped me decide to become a Catholic.