Pablo Escobar and the Male Archetype

Pablo Escobar from Narcos.

I’m currently watching Narcos on Netflix and finding myself in the strange position of being both repulsed by and kind of liking the character of Pablo Escobar. He is, of course, a horrible man. But he also is a good family man. He’s much like the Tony Soprano character- a likable, but pretty evil guy. He takes care of his family and he takes care of his crew members (for the most part). He is a provider and a protector, admirable traits to men.

This is why our culture needs stable, admirable archetypes. Without them, we start to gravitate away from the proper role model, JC.

10 Books That Changed My Thinking

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Along with links to videos related to the books.

1) Jonathan Haidt’s- The Coddling of the American Mind

2) Jordan Peterson- 12 Rules for Life

3) Thomas Sowell- The Housing Boom and Bust

4) Jesse Lee Peterson- From Rage to Responsibility

5) Douglas Murray- The Strange Death of Europe

6) C.S. Lewis- Mere Christianity

7) Tamler Sommers- Why Honor Matters

8) David Graeber- Bullshit Jobs

9) Warren Farrell- The Myth of Male Power

10) Fyodor Dostoyevsky- Crime and Punishment

DON’T Quit Your Day Job

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There are a lot of gurus out there who will tell you to take a risk, let it rip, see what happens, outwork the competition, etc., etc.

Be careful.

Learn what you can while you’re employed and build your dream on the side. Run it by successful people, read some entrepreneurship books, and KEEP the day job until you’ve put yourself in a very solid position. If you have a 40-hour workweek, take a couple of hours every evening to work on your own business. Go into monk mode. Focus and write a solid business plan. Work out all of the details you can. Then launch. While keeping your day job.

#7Tips to Be a Better Father

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It’s that time of year when we are supposed to recognize our fathers despite raising us under the inherent tyranny that is family life. Here are a few ideas to help you be the best dad you can be, whether your kid deserves it or not. Kidding! They all deserve the best you can offer.

  1. Put the phone down and pay attention! This is perhaps the most important bit of advice I can offer. For at least a little while every day, spend time with your kids without any other distractions. None. Focus! You’re kid will appreciate it greatly and you’ll remember it for years to come.
  2. Carve out one-on-one time with each kid regularly. This is obviously easier in some families than others, but try to spend that one-on-one time on at least a weekly basis. Maybe every Saturday morning or every Sunday afternoon. With some flexibility, of course.
  3. Remember you are being watched. I was watching my 4.75-year-old eat cereal the other day and after he had finished scooping out and eating the O’s, he picked up the bowl and drink it down like a hungry orphan. This is something I learned my from father and he learned from his, no doubt. Anyway, everything you do is being watched carefully. And eventually, much of that behavior will be acted out. So behave yourself.
  4. Educate yourself a little. There are more and more resources available to parents. In the DC area, we have a fantastic organization called the Parent Encouragement Program that offers dozens of classes online and in-person on positive parenting. I’ve taken a few. Very helpful.
  5. Take good care of yourself. If you are responsible for others, whether financially or otherwise, it’s critical that you make sure they are cared for and supported. Eat healthy. Exercise. Go to the doctor. It’s not that hard and it’s very important.
  6. Play rough with your boys. There is some evidence that ADHD is linked to a lack of rough play in childhood. There are some who argue that it may just be a sleep deficit. I’m on the fence. I have it. I’m just not sure what causes it.
  7. Try to get along with the mother of your child. This may be the hardest one, especially in cases of divorce, but it’s important. Really try!

Will try to update this with links ASAP.- dv

Let your ‘Yes’ mean ‘Yes,’ and your ‘No’ mean ‘No.’

In today’s gospel, Jesus calls on us to not declare false oaths, but to simply speak the truth. This message has been lost in the modern era of talking points and tribalism.

How can we restore the Christian value of honesty, and the related values of humility, sacrifice, service? One by one, every man and woman saying, “Enough! We’ve had enough of the postmodern woke corporate nonsense that pervades our culture.”

It’s time to usher in an era of self-reliance, individual freedom, and optimism. I’m sorry to say this to the atheists, but only Christianity will lead us that way.

Choosing to Be an Atheist Is Like Choosing to Be an Orphan

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Being an orphan is a tragic thing. I know, I was raised by one. It’s even worse when you try to go through life without moral and ethical guidance. I tried. For 40 years, I thought I was a good person and that being so was enough to get by in life. It’s not. Because you need the other people in your life to adhere to a moral code, too.

There is a wisdom to religion that Sam Harris and the New Atheists don’t grasp. It is the wisdom of how to live day in and day out, week in and week out. Live with gratitude and work towards a cause much greater than yourself. There is nothing wrong with accepting some help from a father or the Father.

What Do You Do When Your Father Lets You Down?

You love him anyway. Or at least honor him from an arm’s length anyway. Maybe you eventually start to teach him what it means to be a man, a husband, a father, a patriarch.

You forgive him, you do your best to let those betrayals and disappointments float away, and show him how it’s done right.